top of page

Pelvic Tilt Predicament

Maintaining neutral posture plays a crucial role on our overall health and well-being. Among the many types of postural imbalances, pelvic tilt problems are very common.

Having an anterior or posterior pelvic tilt can affect the alignment of the pelvis, leading to muscle imbalances (or vice versa) and can lead to other problems. Improper pelvic alignment can lead to hip pain, SI joint pain, back pain, arthritis, sciatica, hip impingement, loss of range of motion and even disc injury.



Lets look at the differences between posterior and anterior pelvic tilt and how to improve pelvic alignment and overall body balance.



Anterior pelvic tilt occurs when the top of the hip bones (Iliac Crest) are too forward. This increases the amount of curvature in the lumbar spine, which jams the posterior part of the vertebra, restricting extension and pushing the disc material forward.




It is often caused by some sort of muscular imbalance:


1. Hip flexors (aka iliopsoas and rectus femoris) are contracted and therefore shortened but are also weak.

2. Weak glute muscles (aka the glute maximum, medius and minimus) play a vital role in hip stability and proper posture. Weak glutes can fail to counteract the pull of the hip flexors and/or quads,






To help improve anterior pelvic tilt you can:


  1. Stretch and strengthen the iliopsoas.

  2. Stretch the quads (aka rectus femoris).

  3. Strengthen the glutes, especially the medius.

  4. Improve pelvic stability, SI joint and lumbar spine mobility.

  5. Ensure proper alignment in the pelvis.

  6. Improve strength in the trunk, back and side-body.

  7. Get help with proper ergonomics to be sure your are practicing the most neutral posture possible.


Try these exercises-


Supine leg lifts

Dead Bugs

Side-lying leg lifts

Hip circles




Posterior pelvic tilt occurs when the top part of the hips is shifted too far back. This decreases the amount of curvature in the spine and causes the back to be flat. This James the anterior or front part of the vertebra (the spine bones) and pushes the disc material backwards. This can increase the risk of disc herniation and osteophyte formation or arthritis.



Just as with an anterior pelvic tilt, it is primarily caused by a muscular imbalance.


1. Hamstrings (aka biceps femoris, semimembranosis and semitendinosus) are tight and shortened. They pull the pelvis backwards and down.


2. Lower back muscles (aka the erector spinae) are weak and fail to counteract the downward pull of the hamstrings.






To help improve posterior pelvic tilt you can:


  1. Strengthen the back muscles

  2. Stretch and strengthen the hamstrings (remember tight does not equal strong, most of the time these are also weak, like the hip flexors)

  3. Improve hip hinge, SI joint and lumbar spine mobility.

  4. Ensure proper alignment in the pelvis and lumbar spine.

  5. Improve flexibility in the hips and focus on spine fluidity

  6. Get help with proper ergonomics to be sure your are practicing the most neutral posture possible.




Try these exercises-


Bird dogs

Superhumans

Back Extensions

Cat-Cows




It is important to note that addressing anterior or posterior pelvic tilt is a gradual process and requires consistency and patience. If you have discomfort or concerns about you pelvic tilt and how it relates to your posture or pain be sure to consult with the appropriate licensed healthcare profession for a comprehensive evaluation and personalized guidance. Remember every body is different!





5 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

コメント


bottom of page